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2016/01/15

GREED DECENT: A LOVE and HATE STORY TOTE BAGS COMING SOON


A Love and Hate Story


- True knowledge exists in knowing that you know nothing. - Socrates 

Greed Decent: A Love and Hate Story is a small line of tote bags made out of cotton and all over print. The pictures was taken in Athens, Greece and the picture of the first tote with the ruins was taken at New Acropolis Museum in Athens and hosts 4000 artifacts, police tote picture is taken from near Syntagma Square were the parliament is located and most of the violent protests took place during economic and government meltdown.

Back in time and around 470 BC a great philosopher was born Socrates. He one of the founders of Western philosophy together with Plato and Aristophanes. Later Socrates sentenced to death by the state for his believes. In modern Athens the youth was taught by the Classical Athens and adopted similar philosophy. In question how can a Socratic method apply when greed took over in modern Athenian history parallel with politics in "progress" is a big confusion.  Those protests that took place is a sign of confusion rather than a sign of complain?. A hate love story between the greed and the greed for freedom. Those tote bags are dedicated to the support for the continue struggle through out the Athenian history Greed Decent: A Love and Hate Story.

As this line develop we continue to write on references about each bag and soon will be available at the shop

2015/11/30

SPIRIT YOUR MIND I OPENING ON NOVEMBER 30TH I FREE SPIRIT SPORT BAR MIAMI BY CHALET SOCIETY


ON THE OCCASION OF ART BASEL MIAMI



CHALET SOCIETY & LOCUST PROJECTS
REQUEST THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY
FOR THE OPENING OF THE EXHIBITION

SPIRIT YOUR MIND

WITH
MATTHIAS BITZER / SAMUEL BOUTRUCHE  /
CHRISTIAN JANKOWSKI / JESPER JUST /
OLIVER LARIC / GONZALO LEBRIJA / ANGE LECCIA /
JILLIAN MAYER / ANGELICA MESITI / LAURE PROUVOST /
FLORIAN & MICHAEL QUISTREBERT / RAFAEL ROZENDAAL /
JIM SHAW / CHLOE WISE

CURATORS
ISABELLE KOWAL /  MARIE MAERTENS / ANISSA TOUATI

MONDAY NOVEMBER
30TH 2015 / 6:30 - 10 PM

FREE SPIRIT SPORT BAR
100 21 ST ST.
MIAMI, FL 33139
BETWEEN THE HOTEL W AND THE SETAI

RSVP  CONTACT@CHALETSOCIETY.ORG

SPECIAL THANKS TO LAURENT FETIS & SARAH MARTINON, DIMITRI COSTE






Founded by Marc-Olivier Wahler, Chalet Society is a structure designed to encourage reflections on contemporary art institutions and to investigate new possibilities for exhibitions by testing forms, spaces, discourses, and protocols. Chalet Society develops formats that work on a variety of platforms, similar to open source software that can run on any hardware. The Museum of Everything, Chalet Society has become an international renowned art space and proposes alternative audacious exhibitions and events.








Our mailing address is:
8 rue de l'Hôpital Saint-Louis
75010 Paris, France

2015/11/29

MIRANDA LICHTENSTEIN - more Me than mine AT ELIZABETH DEE GALLERY NYC

Elizabeth Dee



location map


more Me than mine

Miranda Lichtenstein

The edges of Miranda Lichtenstein's new photographs are indeterminate, though not in a physical sense. Instead each intuits a series of questions surrounding their making, at the center of which is: what point does an artwork become a subject, or an object? These works result from a two year engagement with the work of fellow New York artist Josh Blackwell, unfolding as part-dialogue, part-homage, and part - obsession, all the while maintaining their own autonomy as artworks.

Like most of Lichtenstein's photographs, they are shot in a small corner of her studio with mirrors and paper screens, treated as malleably as their original materials. For years, Blackwell has been embellishing the ubiquitous detritus of our contemporary society, plastic bags, through intricate yarn embroidery, laser cutting, and the physical fusing of multiple elements. Originally begun as a collaborative effort, Blackwell's work recedes in the narrowness of the camera's viewfinder - this intuitive process of selection favoring Lichtenstein's own subjectivity.

The resultant images are records of her own engagement with Blackwell's painting-sculpture hybrids. They're cropped and enlarged to a scale outside themselves, depicted in fragments with a tactility that mimics our own relationship to the material, something we handle potentially even more than each other. Works like Thank You inhabit a pop sensibility, flattering and recasting the bag's familiar text (that has been degraded in Blackwell's work) as a slogan simultaneously peppy and pessimistic, as if the plastic bag itself were aware of its snide humor as a positive and friendly pollutant. Photographs of Blackwell's Bodega bags alternatively work to inflate their eponymous subjects, giving otherwise flattened works volume, form, coupled with the passage of light. Plastic appears simultaneously fleeting and disposable, as well as monolithic in its permanence and recurrence.

These investigations place Lichtenstein's works within a complicated though often overlooked history of photography's relationship to sculpture, specifically that of artists photographing their own work or other artists work. Lichtenstein points to Man Ray's photograph Dust Breeders, a long exposure of dust gathered on Marcel Duchamp's Large Glass in his New York apartment as being fundamental to this - it's an instance in which a photographic representation divorces itself from the parameters of the work it depicts. A similar operation is enacted in the work of Louise Lawler, in which works themselves fade deeply into the networks and associations they inhabit. Through this, the artwork itself becomes its own kind of found object, one replete with signifiers. This does not diminish its original authorship, but instead affirms the artworks' status as contemporary artifacts of our time, that can be used to develop understandings outside and further than itself.

Throughout the works complicated twists of ownerships and authorships (in most images, Blackwell's work as rendered is nearly unrecognizable), what remains at its core is the generative affinities and admirations that emerge between artists. Underscoring this is the exhibition's sole collaborative work, Welcome Water, a sprawling pile of outsized prints of Blackwell's work. Scanned, and in some instances pieced together by Lichtenstein, each element displays a hyper level of detailing with a space foreign to the photographic image. Translated and transformed by the light of the scanner bed, they spread and expand across the gallery floor - edges overlap, and individual elements blur into a new whole. Mimicking the operation of Lichtenstein's own photographs, the work apparent mutability functions as an outpouring of generosity, and speaks to a malleability of objects and ideas that remains separate from the authors.

                                                                                                                                      Alex Fitzgerald

November 21 - December 19, 2015 


2015/11/13

JEAN TINGUELY AT BARBARA GLADSTONE GALLERY NYC

Barbara Gladstone


location map

Jean Tinguely
November 6-December 19, 2015
Opening November 5, 6-8 pm

Gladstone Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of works by Jean Tinguely. This exhibition will include works by the artist from 1954 through 1991. Salvaged pieces of iron and wheels collected from junkyards provided abstract shapes for the artist. Using these "forms" and incorporating  other found objects, Tinguely welded and assembled sculptures, creating a new function with the byproducts of consumption. He installed old motors, often decommissioned from 78rpm phonographs onto his sculptures to produce unpredictable and non-repeating motion. Within these dynamic sculptures of chance, accident, and inconsistency, Tinguely is perhaps best known in New York for his monumental self-destroying sculpture Homage to New York, presented for only one evening in March of 1960 in the sculpture garden at MoMA.

The earliest work on view in the show will be Tinguely's Meta-Malevich relief from 1954, whose title references constructivist compositions. A hidden pulley and rubber band system behind the pictorial plane moves white geometric shapes in front of the black background in non-repeating arrangements. Also on view will be a large group of his motorized sculptures, including Scooter (1960), a scooter with only one wheel rotated by a motor concealed within its helmet; Rachel Nr.1 (1974), a pair of the Swiss-branded ski boots topped with shears snipping at the air; and Trüffelsau (1984), the skull of a boar brought to life with its jaw comping while its driftwood tail rotates slowly. Several of Tinguely's lamps will also be installed, including L'Odalisque (1989), a 6-part sculpture with light fixtures and moving components.

Jean Tinguely (1925-1991) was born in Fribourg, Switzerland. While Tinguely worked primarily in France and Switzerland, he produced several works and completed commissions throughout Europe, United States, and Japan. His work has been presented at numerous international institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Moderna Musset, Stockholm; Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; and Museum Haus Lange, Krefeld. Retrospectives have been presented by Centre National d'Art Contemporain, Paris (1971); Wilhelm Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg (1978); Zurich Kunsthaus (1982); and Palazzo Grassi, Venice (1987). His work has also been included in major historical exhibitions including "Bewogen Beweging" ("Art in Motion") at Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1961); São Paulo Biennale (1965); "The Machine at MoMA (1968); and "Paris-Paris" at Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1980). In October of 2016, an exhibition of sculptures including Tinguely's "meta-magic" drawing machines will be on view along with his graphic works and artist's books at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.







2015/11/10

ON THE WAY BY THE FDCINCSHOP! FROM NOW ON YOU CAN TRACK YOUR ORDER WITH YOUR CARRIER

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GOOD NEWS ON THE WAY!!. TRACKING YOUR ORDER IS EASY AND SIMPLE WHEN SHOPPING WITH US. CHECK OUT RECENT ARRIVALS IN STOCK. THANK YOU RICHARD! MEET ME AGAIN AT THE SAME SPOT... 


2015/11/07

PHANOS KYRIACOU DAILY LIFE AT MACCARONE GALLERY NYC

Maccarone

location map

Daily Life
October 29 - December 19, 2015

Nickel, what is nickelit is rid of a cover.

-Gertude Stein, "Glazed Glitter"

Maccarone is pleased to present Daily Life, its second solo exhibition with Cyprus-born and -based sculptor Phanos Kyriacou. As is characteristic of his practice, Kyriacou has assembled a new series of objects, most of which are collected from the urban and rural landscapes of his hometown of Nicosia.

Kyriacou scrutinizes and experiments with certain types of things (cast-offs, fragments, tools) in an attempt to reveal their informational complexities and, in the process, decode the world in which they can exist as possibilities. In taking these fragments and adding to them, broken pieces  of monobloc chairs, leaves from a collapsed cactus, and ceramic shards become the conceptual frameworks for reimagining or inventing new wholes. Kyriacou's approach is born out of his interest in documenting "object situations" that spring of chance and his relationships with craftsmen, from which the artist observes and collects both materials from the workshops and the human stories that exist in between.

Kyriacou's additives of casting, covering, or extending offer a variety of results - slight aluminum shapes doubled with plaster, large steel frames that house a menagerie of discards, a heap of plaster casts, or found stones covered with what Kyriacou terms "complimentary forms." Simultaneously acting as both splinters from aggregate forms and autonomous singularities abstracted from their original contexts, they exist in a liminal space, outside of any fixed category or system. Their indeterminate status allows the artist to recontextualize each one through an intuitive process. While craft is a kind of fixed knowledge, a schematic for bringing forms into the world, Kyriacou's own practice negates mastery, highlighting the fragile state of the notion of work and the labor of object-making.



 Not all them have travelled all the way across the Atlantic, so what you all looking at is a distillation of an already rigorous distillation. However, they all do come from the same luminous studio on the second floor of an otherwise lifeless, warehouse, some 5455 miles away. In that room I would always sense a mix of mysterious improbabilities, for instance, I always felt that they have the ability to cleanse the energy of the room or cool down the temperature and dim the noises coming in from the numerous windows surrounding the studio.

What if these powers emanate from their earthly materials? Mountain rocks; fragments of terracotta; metals in a state of coolness. While trying to verbalize this feeling of calmness I sense around them I scribble down: 'Noise mutates into white noise, focus shifts inwards... Something happened before now and now everything is cooling down'.

Before them I feel the total freedom from geography or historical time. Are they from the past, the present, the future, or are they fragments of an interstellar archeology? In a way they manage to 'purify' from the greatest contamination of all; one's expectations.

Of course, I cannot ignore the possibility that these impressions are mere mental projections of the fact that I am aware that these are pure objects themselves; each and every one of these clusters has been gradually stripped down to its most essential elements. Try to lift an object from the 'Fugue of Founds' or the mountain rock from 'Frame Work' and both structures will immediately collapse. This manufactured balance acts as a binding agent unifying the different elements of each cluster, while also instilling movement in them.

In some, the body is inscribed and mediated but never overstated. In 'Monoblock Measurements', the average human body as envisioned be the 'universal' chair is communicated through fragments cast in lead. The weight of lead makes them look like oddly shaped humanoid limbs and before them one can catch a glimpse of the future archaeological museum. In Guide Lines, the camera zooms in on the hand of the craftsman caught in act of making. But what is it making? A universe of things, derivatives of everyday items, since this is a collection of guides created by shaping rods of Bronze on various objects and forms. Now these abstractions act as propositions and tools for making possible, yet, possibly useless objects.

Is their subtle sense of humour cooling down the room temperature?

Looking at the serendipitous teaming of a pile of stones and a terracotta pot wittingly called 'Stone Ware' or the pun-sculptures 'Frame Work' and 'Guide Lines', one unconsciously smiles but also realizes that words here are treated as objects.

In 'Daily Life', the interdependence and unity between forms is a recurring theme that is perhaps more obvious in the cases where there is a 'found' and a 'made'. For example, in 'Fugue of Founds' and the various Complementary Forms, the fragment is being extended by first becoming a guideline for a complementary form, which is subsequently rendered in a heavier material. The incompatible materials highlight the relationship and interdependence between the two otherwise compatible forms that appear as one.

The found in 'Daily Life' is reimagined, completed, doubled and equally made.

And so, it disappears each time it face a possibility of itself.

- N.Y.

Written on the occasion of Daily Life A Maccarone